Assessing Chronic Food and Nutrition Insecurity in the Karamoja Region of Uganda: A Human Rights Perspective

The Karamoja Region of Uganda faces chronic food and nutrition insecurity. For years, the Government of Uganda and development partners have provided food and nutrition services in the region; however, food and nutrition insecurity still persists. This study conducted in May 2013 in Moroto and Kaabong districts found that: 1). The causes of malnutrition were multiple but available nutrition specific and nutrition sensitive interventions often left out the most vulnerable. Further, the adoption of nutrition services by the community was reportedly hindered by several factors. 2). Mothers were found to have some nutrition knowledge; despite this, their actual food and nutrition related practices including breastfeeding were poor and initiation of breast feeding was sometimes delayed until children were given clan names. 3). Community members faced a number of barriers that limited food availability, accessibility and income generation. 4). Realization of the human right to adequate food for the rights holders was far from reality as: malnutrition was still high, accessible diets were inadequate (in terms of nutrient quality, food safety) and recourse mechanisms for seeking redress to violations of the human right to adequate food were inexistent within local government systems.

This is the abstract of a report of the study that was carried out in Karamoja titled “Assessing Chronic Food and Nutrition Insecurity in the Karamoja Region of Uganda: A Human Rights Perspective”.